FrugivoreMag.com: Baked Eggs in Enchilada Sauce

Baked Eggs in Enchilada Sauce

Cooking eggs in thick tomato-based sauces is a canvas to a creative mind’s imagination of flavors. Add diced vegetables, such as mushrooms and blanched potatoes, with the onions. Wilt baby greens over the saucy eggs. For a Spanish-inspired version, use enchilada sauce and garnish it with sliced scallions, chopped pimento-stuffed green olives, fresh cilantro, and queso blanco—or manchego–cheese. Garnish a basic Italian-inspired sauce with black kalamata olives, Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese and basil leaves. If you’re not a vegetarian, finish this dish with chopped pork, duck or turkey bacon for a salty and crispy flavor. Read more

Red Cabbage and Snow Pea Salad

Shredded Red Cabbage and Snow Pea Salad

Colors make my world go round. When creating a dish, the taste and visual appearance is what influences the creativity. The ability to imagine colorful combination on the plate comes from a graphic design background. One of my favorite color combination is green and purple, for they harmonize well together. When a salad uses vegetables with those colors, it’s visually stunning. This Red Cabbage and Snow Pea Salad is a type of cole slaw without mayonnaise or a creamy dressing. The surprise green vegetable is snow peas, instead of leafy green. The leafy vegetable instead is the red cabbage. Read more

A Tale of Two Lasagnas

Both "New and Old" World Lasagnas
Food Bloggers visit other sites quite frequently to support, inspire, comment, and learn. I found Anjali Shah of The Picky Eater: A Healthy Food Blog, through another excellent food blog, The Duo Dishes. I remember leaving a comment on her site about being an inspiration. The voice of her food blog is of good spirits and full of adventure. She responds immediately to request a guest post for her site. “We’re really aligned in our food philosophies,” she reasons. After several emails are exchanged, we agree to collaborate on writing about lasagna. Both of our versions are relatively healthy, and they have plenty of vegetables and cheeses. Anjali’s version is an “Old World” traditional recipe with a classic tomato sauce, and my version is a “New World” traditional recipe sans the tomato sauce. To be historically accurate, both tomatoes and squash are ingredients from the “New World.” It’s the techniques and stories that separates our recipes, which makes them endearing and comforting to both of us. Read more

Radicchio Frittata

Radicchio Fritatta
Radicchio Fritatta

A few weeks ago, Menu-Masters.com, requested a guest post. The website emails weekly recipes and a shopping list to hurried individuals. There are menu plans for the unrestricted, vegetarians and gluten-aware diets. When thinking of what to contribute to Menu-Masters.com, I decided to write about the weekday breakfast. In addition, my thoughts are about crisp radicchio leaves and devising savory recipes with it. One such recipe, a Radicchio Frittata, came to mind. Enjoying this savory egg dish on a weekday is quite possible when meals are planned ahead. When packed and stored right, it’s enjoyed throughout the week. It’s an extravagant (and easy on the budget) recipe. If bacon is omitted, it’s a “Meatless Monday” dish. Visit Menu.Masters.com to read the guest post or get the recipe… Read more

Corn, Green Bell Pepper and Potato Frittata with Tomato Salsa

Corn, Green Bell Pepper and Potatoes Frittata Slice with Tomato Salsa
Corn, Green Bell Pepper and Potatoes Frittata Slice with Tomato Salsa

Quite a few years ago, a friend in my undergraduate printmaking class made a simple observation. She mentioned I have fewer problems with difficult printing techniques, but the easy techniques cause me the most trouble. She found the insight about my simple printmaking problems amusing.

Once again, making an omelet is fairly simple for most people, but it causes me problems. My version sticks to the pan and tears easy. The chopped vegetables spill out of the folded egg. With an aversion to runny eggs, a gorgeous, fluffy omelet ends up turning into a rubberize brown. Hope is lost and the omelet gets scrapped into a scramble. It’s tasty, but the elegance is lost. I do trust my skills in making omelets are improving. Until that day in the near future arrives, the frittata will continue to be an easy adaption to my shortcoming of making an omelet. Read more