Frittata with Baby Spinach, Sweet Potatoes, Young Fontina Cheese, Red Onions and Fresh Rosemary
Frittata with Baby Spinach, Sweet Potatoes, Young Fontina Cheese, Red Onions and Fresh Rosemary

Does this recipe look crazy or tastefully coordinated? It was a well thought out experiment, because green compliments orange. The difficult decision was determining which big cheese to add to the frittata. Ricotta was too salty for the dish. Comte would have competed with the other flavors. Fresh mozzarella is a mild cheese with an overvalue taste (For example, a macaroni and cheese recipe with more than four cheeses, including mozzarella, is showing off gooey numbers. The strategy is the masterful coordination of three to four chesses to create a creamy, sharp taste). A short trip to a store’s cheese department helped finalized the decision. The sales clerk offered a few suggestions of cheeses that would’ve naturally dominated the dish. Concerned about choosing too strong of a cheese, mozzarella was about to be the winning choice, again. That’s when it was suggested to try a young fontina cheese, instead. It’s another mild cheese, with a little more flavor. A winning cooking strategy demonstrating a brilliant coordination skill, young fontina paired well with the spinach and the sweet potatoes.

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Apple Fennel Salad with Grilled Cheddar Cheese and Apple on Raisin Cinnamon Bread Sandwich
Apple Fennel Salad with Grilled Cheddar Cheese and Apple on Raisin Cinnamon Bread Sandwich

The chefs on the FoodNetwork’s show, Chopped, do wonders at the strange ingredients presented to them. One show used canned jackfruit. Another show had the chefs make an appetizer with live eel, peas and ugly peaches. On the show, they’re three rounds: an appetizer, a main course and the dessert. After each round, a judgment is made. The contestant’s dish that’s on the “chopping block” after the silver dome is lifted, is eliminated from the competition. The winner takes home a $10,000 prize. These chefs are brave to display their knowledge and skills in front of the camera. There are no factors that would give one chef a competitive edge. It’s creativity that wins the game. Read more