Louisiana White Shrimp and Butter Bean Salad

{This is a three part series. Read Part I and II of How New Orleans Marches On.}

The last supper. It was prepared by four chefs: Brian Landry from Louisiana, Wesley True from Alabama, Randy Evans from Texas and Derek Emerson from Mississippi. Before we broke bread at Borgne Restaurant, we had a round table discussion to clarify common misconceptions about Gulf seafood.  Read more

Deanies Fried Seafood Platter
Deanies Fried Seafood Platter

{This is a three part series. Read “How New Orleans Marches On, Part I” here.}

It’s been several years since Hurricane Katrina and an oil spill wrecked havoc in the gulf. Most recently, there was flooding from the Mississippi river, spilling fresh water into many saltwater oyster beds. The oysters in the gulf–American or Eastern varieties–are one of the few places in the world demanding a precarious mix of fresh and saltwater. Other oyster varieties in the world, including regions in the United States, only live in salt waters. With numerous disastrous hitting the the gulf states, one might think the seafood industry is in decline. It isn’t, and it’s determined to return to their worldwide number one status.  Read more

Shrimp Salad at the Gumbo Shop

When I think back on my trip to New Orleans, the one dish I won’t forget is Chef Susan Spicer of Bayona Restaurant’s Oyster Rockefeller with ramps. There are no pictures, because I chose to experience the moment of savoring the flavor of sweet oysters cooked with mild garlicky, fresh ramps. It was truly divine. As mentioned here, I flew to New Orleans for a two day-trip to learn how the gulf states are moving forward after an oil spill and hurricanes courtesy of The Gulf Seafood Marketing Coalition. It was a trip to learn about one of the world’s most competitive and regulated seafood industries, a bit about marine wildlife and mostly about eating abundant fresh seafood.  Read more